STANISLAVSKI'S PRINCIPLES

 Photo by Jocelen Janon of my character "M" from Patrick Graham's play "Lost Girls".

Photo by Jocelen Janon of my character "M" from Patrick Graham's play "Lost Girls".

Why hello good lookin'!

Welcome to my bi-weekly blog!

For those of you who don't know, I'm an educated, trained and experienced drama teacher. I've taught acting and theatre from 2008, getting my Graduate Diploma in Teaching (Secondary) in 2010 and have taught everywhere from kindergartens to high schools (I was even a Co-HOD of a drama department once!). 

Now, if you've dipped your toes into the world of acting, you've probably heard about several schools of acting. The main ones I'm going to reference are Meisner and the other being Stanislavski. What are the differences? I found this explanation on Camp Broadway and thought it sounded pretty spot on! 

"Stanislavski is all about what he calls the “given circumstance.” An actor has to ask, “where is my character in this scene and what is going on around him/her in order for them to say and do the things they say and do?” No matter who you study, always remember– you always move on stage, and say things on stage with a purpose. And that purpose is always to advance the scene, and tell the story.
Stanislavski also believes in finding a situation in actors’ lives that can compare to what the character might be going through in the scene. For example, let’s examine how he might suggest breaking down a break up scene with a significant other. Although you might not have a significant other, or may never have had one, you probably have had heated, emotional fights with someone in your life at some point. Stanislavski says to use that fire of the heated emotional fight, and apply it to the fight your character is having with their significant other.
Meisner, on the other hand, believes that the way you react onstage depends on how you are given your cue line. For example, a phrase as simple as “stop that!” can be said many different ways. If your scene partner decides to tickle you to get your reaction, you would giggle and maybe flirt back “stop that!” Or, your scene partner could be arguing, and you could turn around and scream “stop that!”It’s the same line, but you are reacting to the energy that your scene partner has given you as a lead-in to your line."

So basically - Stan-the-man is all about pre-meditative action and using your own experiences to fuel your on-stage action, while Meisner is all about reacting in the moment, without pre-meditated thought. 

I was taught acting via the Stanislavski method, which I still use to this day as a part of my live performances. However, Meisner is totally relevant and I definitely use it - especially in improv!

In 2013, I made a two-part series of videos about acting technique and the Stanislavski principles and his fundamental questions. If you click the video below it should play both videos one after the other. So rather than me write a whole bunch of words, grab yourself a coffee (and a treat), open up your jot pad (be sure to have a pen handy) and watch the videos below. 

Professional development that's free and you don't even need to leave the comfort of your own home!

You're welcome ;)